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1999-37 Warren Smith & Riverglades Elementary School RESOLUTION NO. 99 - 37 A RESOLUTION OF lHE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PARKLAND, FLORIDA, COMMENDING RIVERGLADES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AND PRINCIPAL WARREN SMIlH FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS AND RANKING IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA'S COMPRE- HENSIVE ASSESSMENT TESTS WHEREAS, The entire Parkland community welcomed Riverglades Elementary School six years ago and has perpetually supported the school, its programs, and taken great pride in the numerous achievements since its inception, and WHEREAS, Riverglades Elementary School continues to be a significant source of community pride because of its dedication to the education of the City's elementary school children, and WHEREAS, the State established a comprehensiv~ grading system to measure the success of all public schools in the State and Riverglades Elementary received an "A" grade based on test results, and WHEREAS, this achievement is truly notable in that only 12 Broward County schools or 6% of the entire schools in the County received this significant designation. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PARKLAND, FLORIDA: Section 1. Riverglades Principal Warren Smith and his staff are publicly commended for the perpetuation of excellence in elementary education that has become the standard in Riverglades Elementary School. Section 2. The entire school community is to be highly regarded for this recent achievement of excellence of the State of Florida testing process. Section 3. The Mayor, City Commission, and City Hall staff extend continuing appreciation and regard to Riverglades Elementary School since we firmly believe the quality of education at our local elementary school has been and will be in the "A" category . Section 4. The Mayor, City Commission, and City Hall staff pledge continuing cooperation and support to the staff and students of Riverglades Elementary School with the certainty that the school will continue to be a source of community pride. PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS 1 5 DAY OF September 1999. crITOFP~ ~ - SAL P AGLI YOR ATTEST: 9MN~ HELEN L YNO , CMC, AAE CITY CLERK ~ THE SCHOOL BOARD OF BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA - --- -- . - - -~ ... - V. RIVERGLADES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Warren D. Smith, Principal 7400 Parkside Drive Parkland, Florida 33067 954-341-8050 SCHOOL BOARD Chairplmon LOIS WEXLER Vice Chairperson ~ L, CARTER CAROLE L, ANDREWS mOlE S. BUDNICK PAUL 0, EICHNER. ESQ. STEPHANIE ARMA KRAFf. ESQ. MIRIAM M. OUPHANT DR, ROBERTO. PARKS DIANA WASSERMAN ALEXIS WOLFSON Student Advisor September 2, 1999 DR, FRANK TILL Superintendent of Schools Mr. Harry Mertz, City Manager City of Parkland 6500 Parkside Drive Parkland, FL 33067 Dear Mr. Mertz, On behalf of the entire Riverglades School Community, I would like to sincerely thank you for allowing the City maintenance personnel to mow and trim our school campus. They did a fantastic job and Riverglades never looked better for its "Back to School" Open House and for opening day. We are certainly pleased to have a close working relationship with the City of Parkland and look forward to continuing our partnership in the years to l'ome. Working together enables both the school and the city to provide the highest quality service to the community. J am enclosing information regarding the Governor's A+ School Plan. Riverglades is extremely proud of our 11 A" rating, and we are very pleased that Parkland is planning to recognize our accomplishment. The first document gives an overview of the school grading plan and the last paper of the research brief shows how Riverglades met the criteria for the" A" grade. Please don't hesitate to call me if any additional information is needed, Again, we really appreciate the support that you have given to our school. Sincerely, ~ Warren D. Smith Principal Transforming Education: One Student At A Time Broward County Public Schools Is An Equal Opponunity/Equal Access Employer THE SCHOOL BOARD OF BROW ARD COUNTY, FLORIDA OmCE OF THE INTERIM SUPERINTENDENT June 24, 1999 DOROTHY J. ORa, ED.D. INTERIM SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Telephone: 765-6271 Facsimile: 760-7 83 Llr" ~ {t~f'(f. All Principals Dorothy J. Orr, Ed.D. i'OfL..A / Interim Superintende~~~; '- TO:' FROM: SUBJECT: RESEARCH BRIEF: STATUS OF SCHOOL PERFORMANCE: APPLYING THE NEW ST ATE ACCOUNTABILITY CRITERIA UNDER FLORIDA'S A+ PLAN Today, the Florida Department of Education (DOE) released their 1999 School Accountability Report. This year, the report of school performance is based on standards included in the State Board of Education Rule 6A-1.09981 (as amended in January, 1999) and modifications to this rule resulting from the application of the new law CSIHB 751, 753 ~d 755, also known as the A+ Plan, approved by the legislature in May, 1999. Under the new legislation, schools receive grades on an "A through F" scale based on student. performance. The 1999 School Accountability Report considers student academic performance based on the results of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test for the areas of reading (grades 4, 8, and 10) and mathematics (grades 5, 8, and 10) and the Florida Writing Assessment (Florida Writes!) for the area of writing (grades 4,8, and 10.) For the upper school grading categories, the report also considers the performance of student subgroups (according to economically disadvantage status and racelethnicity classifications), whether school data on percent of students absent for more than 20 days, percent suspended, dropout rate (for high schools) are below state averages, and substantial improvement. According to the new legislation, schools are identified as being in one of the following five grade categories: (a) "A," schools making excellent progress; (b) "B," schools making above average progress, (c) "C," schools making satisfactory progress; (d) "0," schools making less than satisfactory progress; or (e) "F," schools failing to make adequate progress. provided through the extended school year, Broward is developing stringent instructional models and schedules to optimize student learning time during the regular instructional day. DJO/CVRJKAB/MRL:tbm Attachment cc: School Board Members Superintendent's Cabinet Area Directors DAC Student Advisor to the Board ESE Advisory ESOL Advisory PTA Also, no schools with less than 90% of their standard curriculum students tested may be graded higher than "C" and any school with 80% or less of standard curriculum students tested, will be graded with an incomplete ("1'') until this issue is resolved. Upon the application of the new criteria, there ar.e 12 "A" schools in Broward County, 21 "B" schools, 76 "C" schools, 65 "D" schools, 6 "F" schools and 2 "I" schools. The following chart indicates the breakdown of these school grading categories according to school level. Grade Elementary Middle High A 5 7 0 B 19 2 0 C 50 14 12 D 48 9 8 F 4 1 1 I 0 O' 2 According to the A+ Plan, a school would have to be graded an "F" school for two years to be considered for the voucher system. The voucher system will not be applicable to Broward County this year because no Broward schools met this criteria. The report shows that public schools in Broward County have addressed the challenge of higher standards raised by the State's legislature and maintain increases in student perfonnance. Given the challenges facing an urban school district the size of Broward County, morc and morc of our students arc meeting or exceeding our expectations. Although great strides have been made, our work is still in progress. Broward County Public Schools has provided support and assistance to schools through the implementation of programs such as the Alliance of Quality Schools and the identification of critical content and essential teacher knowledge in the subject areas that reflect the Sunshine State Standards. However, our continued focus is the academic progress of each student. In the 1999 Summer Term Program, all students identified as in greatest need, as defined by the FCA T assessment (Levell) will participate in an intensive curriculum focusing on deficiencies in reading, writing, and mathematics. Over 67 schools in Broward are currently under this intensive curriculum program. Also, an Intensive Acceleration Academy Model will be piloted at three elementary schools. The model uses embedded teacher training, intensive monitoring of student progress, a prescriptive curriculum, and an evaluation component based on increases in student achievement and attendance patterns. Broward has submitted an application to receive state funds for the planning and implementation of an extended, 210-day school year targeted at those schools in the lowest grading categories. In addition to ensuring that more time-on-task will be The School Board of Broward County. Florida ~or~ l.~ Research Brief Report from the Office of the Interim SUperintendent Sumber 31 June. 1999 Status of School Performance Applying the New State Accountability Criteria under Florida's A+ Plan Five years ago, the State of Florida's DOE implemented the Florida System of School Improvement and Accountability outlined in the State Board of Education Rule 6A-l.09981. The rule set statewide criteria for identifying and defining critical(l' low perfonning schools based on the academic perfonnance of students for two consecutive academic years. Rule 6A-l.09981 was amended on Januarv 24, 1999 to reflect the statewide adoption of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCA 1). The FCA T now replaces the nonn-reference tests previously used by the districts to measure student academic perfonnance in reading and mathematics. The amended rule also modified the classification of schools from four to five levels. On May, 1999, the state legislature approved a new law (CS/HB 751, 753 and 755, also known as the Bush-Brogan A+ Plan). This new law establishes comprehensive refonns to the current Florida School Code and practice. Among other changes or components, the new law provides substantial changes in school, educator, and student accountability. Under the new legislation, schools will receive grades on an U A through F" scale based on student perfonnance. How did Florida's DOE previously measure student academic performance under former Rule 6A. 1.09981 ? Fonner Rule 6A-l.09981 used six data points covering three subject areas (reading, mathematics, and writing) to measure student achievement at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Student perfonnance in mathematics and reading at the elementary and middle school level was measured through nonn-referenced tests administered by individual districts. Broward County Public Schools used the Stanford Ach,ievement Test, Eighth Edition (SA T8). The High School Competency Test (HSCT) was used to measure communications and mathematics achievement at the high school level. The Florida Writing Assessment (Florida Writes!) was used to measure writing perfonnance at all school levels. How will Florida's DOE measure student academic performance under the Dew law? Under the new law, and beginning with the 1998-99 school year, Florida's Department of Education will no longer use the districts' nonn-referenced test results for grades four and eight as one of the State's indicators to detennine school perfonnance.. Scores from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCA n are used instead. The FCA T measures student reading perfonnance in grades four, eight, and ten and Division or Accountability, TechnolOlY, Str.tllic Plannin.and School Improvement mathematics performance in grades five, eight, and ten. Whit criteria \\'ere used to define Critic,"" Low Performina Schools in tbe past! Under. the former State Board of Education Rule 6A-I.0998I, there were minimum performance criteria to assess schools, specified for each school level. These criteria are presented in Table I. If a school had all six scores (for the Table I three subject areas) below minimum in two consecutive years, that school was identified as critically low performing and listed in group one. Schools with four or five low scores were identified in group two. If a school received one, two, or three scores below the State's minimum perfonnance criteria, it was included in group three. The Schools that . exceeded the State's minimum performance criteria in all three subject areas (those with no low scores) were classified in group four. Florida's Fonner Minimum Performance Criteria by School Level Mathematic Reading Concepts! Comprehension Applications Florida School (above 50th (above 50th Writes HSCT HSCT national national (3 and Level percentile) percentile) above) Communications Mathematics Elementary 33% 33% 33% n.a. n.a. Middle 40% 40% 50% n.a. n.a. High n.a. n.a. 67% 85% passing 80% passing In past yean, how many Broward pubUc schools met the state's criteria for "critlcaUy low performJna" under the old rule? Figure I illustrates the number of Broward schools classified by the DOE in groups one, two, three, and four by school level from 1994-95 to 1997-98. As can be seen in Figure 1, under the fonner criteria, the number of schools classified as critica/{v low perfonning declined &om 25 in 1995, to 12 in 1996, to two in 1997, to zero in 1998. The number of schools classified in group two over the same four years remained relatively constant, 25, 28, 28 and 30, respectively. Group three experienced a reduction in the number of schools from 66 in 1995 to S9 in 1998. At the same time, there was an increase in the number of schools moving into group four, schools with no low scores. The number of schools in this classification steadily increased, from S I schools in 1995 to 71 in 1996 to 77 in 1997 and to 85 in 1998. , 2 Divis"''' Accountablllly, TechnololY, Stn'tlle Plannln.and Schoollmprov.mHt .1995 .1996 .1997 .1998 90 80 70 I 60 !j 50 40 J S 30 z 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 DOE Croup Figure 1. State designation of 8roward schools classified by group, 1995, 1996, 1997 & 1998 under the old accountability system. t:nder the new Iflislation, ~'hat are "school performance arade categories" and how are they assigned? Cnder the A+ Plan legislation, schools receive grades on an "A through F" scale based on their performance. According to the new legislation, schools are identified as being in one of the following five grade categories: (a) "A," schools making excellent progress; (b) "8," schools making above average progress, (c) "C," schools making satisfactory progress; (d) "D," schools making less than satisfactory progress; or (e) "F," schools failing to make adequate progress. Also, no schools with less than 90% of their standard curriculum students tested may be graded higher than "C." For any school with 80% or less of standard curriculum students tested, the school's grade will be an incomplete (hI") until this issue is resolved. Two 8roward schools are currently identified as hI" schools, South 8roward High School, with 72% of students tested, and Hollywood Hills High School, with 78% of students tested. These schools will have 30 days to review their records and notify Florida's DOE of any discrepancies, or to explain their reasons for having a low percent of students tested. Designations of school performance grade categories are based on one school year of performance. The attached appendix identifies school performance grade categories for 8roward County schools. Table 2 presents a view of the measures to be used to detennine a school's performance grade category, starting with the 1998.1999 school year. ~ Table 2 Desiplion of School Perfonnance Grade Catclories For School Years: 1998-1999 & 1999-2000 A school's performance grade category designation shalJ be based on: . Student achievement levels on the FCA T, and . other appropriate perfonn~e data, including, but not limited to, attendance, dropout rate, school discipline data. and student readiness for college, in accordance with state board rule. 2()()()'200 1 . A combination of student achievement scores as measured by the FCA T, . the degree of measured leaminggains of the students, and . other appropriate perfonnance data, including, but not limited to, attendance, dropout rate, school discipline data. and student readiness for coUele. 200 t -2002 " thereafter . Student learning gains as measured by annual FCA T assessments in grades 3 through 10, and . other appropriate perfonnance data, including, but not limited to, attendance, dropout rate, school discipline data. and student readiness for college. UDder the Dew leaislatioD, bow does Florida's DOE identify "A" schools, or tbose maklna exceUeDt prosress? According to the amended State Rule, the criteria for an "An school includes: . Meet grade "B" criteria. . Percent of students absent more than twenty (20) days was below the state average. . Percent of out-of-school suspensions was below the state average. . . For hilb schools, the drop-out rate was below the state average. . There is substantial improvement in readinl. . There is no substantial decline in writing or math from 1998 to 1999. Substantial decline is defmed as five or more percentile points decline in the percentage of students scoring FCA T achievement level 3 and above in math or five or more percentage pOints decline in the percentage of students scoring 3 or above in the Florida Writes! . At least 95% of standard curriculum students were tested. Table 3 states the initial criteria to identify "An and "B" schools according to the amended rule. 4 I 01.1. tl Accoun.ablllty, Technoloo, S.r..eak Planala,and Schoof Impro"l..... Table 3 , Florida's Minin'u:,m Perfonnance Criteria for Grades A and B by School Level FCAT FCAT Florida Writes! Readinl Mathematics SO% of students SO% of students 67% of students scoring at or above scoring at or above scoring .. 3" or level 3 (Grade 4) level 3 (Grade S) above (Grade 4) SOO.4 of students SOO.4 of students 7S% of students scoring at or above scoring at or above scoring " 3" or level 3 (Grade 8) level 3 (Grade 8) above (Grade 8) SOOIO of students SO% of students 80% of students scoring at or above scoring at or above scoring "3" or level 3 (Grade 10) level 3 (Grade 10) above (Grade 10) School Level Elementary School Middle School High School Under the new criteria, how many Broward schools are desilnated as U A " schools? Cpon the application of the Dew criteria, there are 12 "A" schools in Bro"'ard County. Figure 2 illustrates the breakdown of the number of "A" schools by school level. ;0 1 · ~ . "" ~ .. .I N . . z . ElelD. Middle Hllb Scbool Levels Fipre 2. Broward schools classified in grade "A" under the new accountability system. .. A" Schools Bayview Elementary, Eagle Point Elementary, Ramblewood Elementary, Riverglades Elementary, Silver Ridge I Elementary, Coral Springs Middle, Pioneer Middle. Ramblewood Middle, . Sawgrass Springs Middle, Silver Trail Middle, Tequesta Trace Middle, and Walter C. Young ~fiddle. Under the ne'" leaislalion, how does Florida's DOE identify "B" schools, or those maklna above averale proaress? In addition to the criteria specified above in Table 3, "B" schools need to meet these additional criteria for all school levels: . No student achievement scores of the same student groups for economically disadvantaged and race were below the criteria levels for an "F" school. . At least 90% of standard curriculum students were tested. Under the new criteria, how many Broward schools are deslpated as "B" schools? s nt"tct_ III Arf'ftunt.hllltv. T<<hnnlnn-. Strat..t&! P1annln. and SehoollmDrDvemenl C pon the appUcation of the new criteria, there are 21 "B" schools in Bro~'ard County. Figure 3 illustrates the breakdown of the number of "B" schools by school level. " lfI - I '- 'I . - i z lfI . . Elem. ~Uddl. HII" School lnels FiJUre 3. Broward schools classified in grade "B" under the new accountability system. Table 4 "B" Schools Central Park Elementary, Chapel Trail Elementary, Cooper City Elementary, Coral Park Elementary, Country Isles Elementary, Embassy Creek Elementary, Everglades Elementary, Gator Run Elementary,Griffin Elementary, Hawkes Bluff Elementary, Horizon Elementary, Indian Trace Elementary, Maplewood Elementary, Panther Run Elementary, Pembroke lakes Elementary, Pines lakes Elementary, Riverside Elementary, Welleby Elementary, Westchester Elementary, Forest Glen Middle, and Indian Ridle Middle. Under the Dew lelislatioD, how does Florida'. DOE ideDtify "C" schools, or those makina satisfactory prolress? The criteria for identification of "C" schools include (a) no student achievement scores below the criteria for an F school, and (b) the school does not meet the criteria for designation as an .. A" or" B" school. Table 4 indicates the criteria used to identify "C," "0," and "F" schools. Florida's Minimum Performance Criteria for Grades C. o. and F bv School level FCAT FCAT Readma ~Iathematics Florida Writes! 6()O.Io of students 60% of students 50% of students scoring at or scoring at or scoring" 3" or above above level 2 above level 2 (Grade 4) (Grade 4) (Grade 5) 600.10 of students 60% of students 67% of students scoring at or scoring at or scorinl "3" or above above level 2 above level 2 (Grade 8) (Grade 8) (Grade 8) 60% of students 60% of students 75% of students scoring at or scoring at or scoring .. 3" or above above level 2 above level 2 (Grade 10) (Grade 10) (Grade 10) School Level Elementary School Middle School High School 6 DMsion of .o\ccountablllty, Ttchnoloo, Stratealc P1annln.and Schoollmpro\'.mnt Under the new criteria, how many Broward schools are desipatecl as "C" schools? Upon the appUcadon of the new criteria, there. are 77 "C" schools In Broward County. Figure 4 illustrates the breakdown of the number of "C" schools by school level. .. , J ;)l " .. .. t ,. z . - . E.... MI.... HIP School Lft'. FiiW'C 4. Broward schools classifi~. in grade "C" under the new accountablbty system. "C" Schools Atlantic West Elementary, Banyan Elementary, Bennett Elementary, Boulevard Heights Elementary, Coconut Creek Elementary, Coral S= Elementary, Davie Elementary, o eld Beach Elementary, Driftwood Elementary, Eagle Ridge Elementary, Flammao Elementary, Floranada Elementary, Forest Hills Elementary, Stephen Foster Elementary, Fox Trail Elementary, Harbordale Elementary, Hollywood Central Elementary, Hollywood Hills Elementary, James Hunt Elementary, Lakeside Elementary, Margate Elementary, Mirror Lake Elementary, Morrow Elementary, N. Andrews Gardens Elementary, Nob Hill Elementary, Nova Eisenhower Elementary, Nova Fonnan Elementary, Oakland' Park 'Elementary, Oakridge Elementary, 'Orange Brook Elementary, Palm Cove Elementary, Park Springs Elementary, Pasadena Lakes Elementary, Pembroke Pines Elementary, Annabel Perry Elementary, Peters E.lementary, Pinewood Elementary, Quiet Waters Elementary, Sandpiper Elementary, Sawgrass Elementary, Sea Castle Elementary, Sheridan Park Elementary, Silver Lakes Elementary, Silver Palms Elementary, Stirling Elementary, Tamarac Elementary, Tradewinds Elementary, Tropical Elementary, Winston Park Elementary, Virginia Young Elementary, Apollo .Middle, Bair Middle, Driftwood Middle, Margate Middle, Nova Middle, Olsen Middle, Pines Middle, Plantation Middle, Pompano Beach Middle, Rickards Middle, Seminole Middle, Silver Lakes Middle, Sunrise Middle, Westpine Middle, Cooper City High, Coral Springs' High, Flanagan High, Fort Lauderdale High. McArthur High. Northeast High, Nova High, Plantation High, Pompano Beach Institute for International Studies, Stoneman Douglas High, Stranahan High, . J.P. Taravella High, and Western High. Under the new lealsladon. how does Florida's DOE identify "D" schools, or thOle maldnl less than satisfactory prop'esl? According to the amended State Rule 6A. 1.09981, a school is designated a "0" school if, for either of the two most recent years, the student achievement scores in at least one (1) of the six subject areas were below the criteria for an "F" school. However, according to the Governor's A + Plan, the criteria to detennine the 7 Dlv"'" 01 Accou.tabUIty. T......... Stnt... PIM.... aad Se..ooIl..prov.....t desianation of I "0" school will be applied on one year of student pelfonnance data instead. Under the new criteria, how man)' Broward schools are deslpated as "D" schools? Upon the application of the new criteria, there are 6S "0" schools in Broward County. Schools could be classified as "0" if they had one or two areas below the criteria. There were 43 schools with two area. below the crlterlL There were 22 schools with ODe area below the criteria. Fiaure S illustrates the breakdown of the number of "0" schools by school level. J. , . i z . D with ODe area below criteria . D with two areas below criteria , J6 . . - . EI... MWdII Hip ScMlllAY. Fiwe S. Broward schools classifi~ . in grade "0" under the new accountablhty system. "D" Schools With 1 Score Below Criteria Croissant Park Elementll)', Cypress Elementll)', Lake Forest Elementary, Markham Elementary, Mcnab Elementll)', Miramar Elementary, Norcrest Elementary. Pompano Beach Elementary, Sheridan Hills Elementary, Sunshine Elementary, W~t Hollywood Elementary, Wilton Manon Elementary. Attucks Middle, Crystal Lake Middle, Deerfield Beach Middle, McNicol Middle, New River Middle, Parkway Middle, Henry O. Perry Middle. Coconut Creek Hi~. Miramar Hiah. and South Plantation High. "D" Schools With 2 Scores Below Criteria Bethune Elementary, Broadview Elementary. Broward Estates Elementary, Castle Hill Elementary, Castle Hill Annex Elementary, Colbert Elementary, Collins Elementary, Cresthaven Elementary, Oania : Elementary, Oeertield Park I ! Elementary, Charles Drew I I Elementary, Fairway Element~, i Hallandale Elementary, Kmg Elementary, Larkdale Elementary, Lauderdale Manon Elementary, P.T. Lauderhill Elementary, Lloyd Estates Elementll)', Thurgood Marshall Elementary, ~orth Lauderdale Elementary, Nonh Side Elementary. Oriole Elementary, Palmview Elementary, Park Ridge Elementary, Plantation Elementary, Plantation Park Elementary, Riverland Elementary, Rock Island Elementary, Royal Palm Elementary, Sanden Park Elementary, Sunland Park Elementary, Tedder Elementary, Villase Elementary, Walker Elementary, Watkins Elementary, Westwood Heights Elementary, William Dandy Middle, Lauderhill Middle, Boyd H. Anderson Hip, Dillard High, Ely High, Hallandale Hip, and Pi High. 8 Dlvlllon ., "ccou...~lltJ. T.llaotou. Stntlllc Plannln. and Scllool hnprove..eat How does Florida's DOE identify "f'9 schools, or those faUinl to make "adequate prolress?" Each school identified as critically low perfonnin, based on both 1996-1997 and 1997 -1998 school perfonnance data and state-board applied criteria, and that receives a perfonnance arade category designation of UF" based on 1998-1999 school perfonnance data according to the new proposed legislation, shaJl be considered as having failed to make. adequate pro pas for two years in a four- year period. All other schools that receive a perfonnance arade cate,ory designation of "F" based on 1998-99 school perfonnance data shall be considered as havin, failed to make adequate progress for one year. What Dew criteria will be used to define aD "F" school (formerly knOft"ft as a "critically low performina" scbool)? State Board Rule 6A-l.09981, as amended on January 24, 1999, specifies that a school is "critically low perfonnin," and designated School Perfonnance Level 1 (UF" school) if it meets, for' two consecutive years, the criteria specified in Table 4. Under the new criteria, bow many Broward schools are deslpated as "F" or tbose havlnl raned to make adequate prolress for ODe year? According to the new criteria, based on results for the 1999 FCA T administration and the 1999 Florida Writes assessment, . total of sil scbools were catelorlzed as "F" schools, or havin, faHed to mak~ adequate prop-ess for one year. Figure 6 illustrates the breakdown of these UF" schools by school level. 4 ., ,.. '"'l J " ... ... 0 .. J I . z . Elem. Middle 81ah School Levels "F" Schools Dillard Elementary, Hollywood Park Elementary, Meadowbrook Elementary, North Fork Elementary, Lauderdale Lakes Middle, and Deerfield Beach High. ender the proposed new criteria, how man)' schools are designated a. '~F" or those schools havina failed to make adequate prolress for h\'O consecutive years? According to the amended State Rule 6A- 1.09981, in the raU of 1999 school perfonnance levels based on two consecutive years were to be designated from: · Student achievement data using 1997. 98 assessments (SA T8, HSCT, and Florida Writes!) and criteria for fltSt- year data, and . · student achievement data using 1998- 99 assessments (FCA T and Florida Writes!) and criteria for second-year data. Vslnl the above criteria, DO Broward schools were Identlfled a. "F" schools. bavln, railed to make .adequate pro,ress for two consecutive yean. ^ Under the new criteria, how many Bro"'ard schools are desllnated as "f" or those havinafaOed to make adequate progress for two yean in a four year period? According to the new leaislation, "each school identified as critically low perfonning based on both 1996-1997 and 1997-1998 school perfonnance data and state board-adopted criteria, and that receives a perfonnance arade cateaory designation of "F" based on 1998-1999 school perfonnance data, shall be considered as havina failed to make adequate progress for two years in a four- year period." There were only two Broward schools identified as critically low perfonning in 1996-1997 (Markham and Thurgood Marshall) and none identified in 1997- 1998. Markham and Marshall did not meet the criteria to be designated as hF" schools in 1998-1999. Therefore, no Broward scbools were identJfJed as T schools. havin, faDed to make adequate prolre's for two yean in a rour-year period. What wa. the gradinl in school performance of Charter Schools in Broward County? Four chaner schools were reported in the 1999 School Accountability Report. There was one charter school identified in each of the category grades for "8," "e," hO," and "F" schools. The charter schools are City of Pembroke Pines Charter, Somerset Neighborhood Chaner, North Lauderdale Charter, and Smart School, respectively. Summa!)' The standards for school perf'onnance in Florida have been raised as a result of the adoption of the A+ plan and the new accountability system. The most recent release of the School Accountability Report by the Florida Department of Education on the status of our schools' perfonnance indicates that 8roward schools are addressing that challenge. This is the result of the five-year focus on student learning for all. As evidenced by. the fmdinas, one of the district's Major System Priorities of lmpro'r'ing Student Achi~'ement and School EjJecti"r'eness is being realized. Int~rventions have been put in place over the last five years to reflect our practice of allocating unequal resources to schools with the greatest needs. Broward County Public Schools will continue to provide support and assistance to schools through the followina continuing actions: . The School Assistance Plan, desianed to help schools in greatest need of assistance and coordinated by the Office of School Improvement and Accountability. This assistance plan identifies schools ac~ording to their perfonnance on the DOE indicators and provides for specific prescriptive strategies for schools in need of assistance. Schools with consistent gains are also identified and serve as demonstration sites for other schools in the district. . The Alliance of Quality Schools model, which has demonstrated positive effects on student's perfonnance and behavior at the elementary and middle school level currently operating at 34 elementary schools and six middle schools in the 1998-99 school year. · Throuah the Office of Educational Programs, Broward County Public Schools has taken the lead in identifying, for each grade level, critical content and essential teacher knowledge in Lanpage Arts and Mathematics. To ensure these skills are beina tauaht in the classroom, Curriculum Specialists in these subject areas have identified resources and developed materials to be shared Divis'" 01 Accounlabllity, Technoloo. Slralealc "annln, and SchoollmproYtlllttll 10 I with schools. Intensive staff development is being implemented to guarantee that all school statT can apply the, standards to their instructional program and see the relationship between their instructional practices and the assessment tools. . Sroward will continue the reconfiguration of the areas to provide closer support to the schools by reducing the school-to-area support staff ratios. Future Actions In addition, Sroward County Public Schools will be implementing the following actions and interventions: . All students identified as "substantially deficient" students (Levell), as defined by the FCA T assessment and correlated to other assessments will participate in the 1999 Summer Tenn Program. For that purpose, a total of 112 elementary through high schools and IS centers will be open and will offer an intensive curriculum focusing on deficiencies in reading, writing, and mathematics. . In addition, during the 1999 Summer T enn, Sroward will pilot a unique Intensive Acceleration Academy Model at three elementary schools. This model will utilize highly qualified teachers with extensive reading background, class sizes of an 18 to 1 student/teacher ratio, and technology. The implementation of this model also involves embedded teacher training, intensive monitoring of student progress, a prescriptive curriculum, and an evaluation component. The evaluation of the summer school pilot will be based on increased student achievement, and . attendance patterns tied to student achievement and will use a control group of students. · Broward submitted its application to recei ve grant funds from the Florida Department of Education for the planning and implementation of an extended, 210-day school 'year. In . j,lddition to ensuring that more time- on-task will be provided through the extended school year, Sroward is developing stringent instructional models and schedules to optimize student learning time during the regular instrUctional day. · The two schools identified with a grade of incomplete "I" will review their records. Within the next 30 days, these schools will provide Florida's DOE with any corrections that could modify the DOE's calculations of the percent of standard curriculum students tested, or an explanation that justifies their low percent tested. Prepared by: Maria R. Ligas, Ph.D. Researcn ~pecialist, Title I Research and Evaluation Dean Vaughan, M.S. Database Researcher, Title I Research and Evaluation Dr. Dorothy J. Orr Interim Superintendent of Schools .... . '. - -. . ---,.-.-........ 'P..a....l_ C....._I.. PI.....I... ...,t ~h_lllllnrnv.m.nl 11 Appendix ELE~ESTARYSCHOOLS "A'" SCHOOLS "e'" SCHOOLS (Continued) "D" SCHOOLS "'lTH Z SCORES BELOW CRITERIA SA YVIEW HUNT. JAMES EAGLE POINT LAKESIDE BEl'HlJ'NI RAMBLEWooD MARGA TE BROADVIEW RJVERGLADES MIRROR LAKE BROWARD ESTATES SIL VER RIDGE MORROW CASTLE HILL N. ANDREWS GARDENS CASTLE HILL ANNEX "8" SCHOOLS NOB HILL COLBERT NOV A EISENHOWER COLLINS CENTRAL PARK NOVA FORMAN CRESTHA VEN CHAPEL TRAIL OAXLAND PARK DANlA COOPER CITY OAKRlDGE DEERfIELD PARK CORAL PARK ORANGE BROOK DREW. CHARLES COUNTR Y ISLES PALM COVE FAIRWAY EMBASSY CREEK PARK SPRINGS HALl.A.~ALE EVERGLADES PASADENA LAKES KING GATOR RUN PEMBROKE PINES lARXDALE GRIFFIN PERRY. ANNABEL LAUDERDALE MANORS HAWKES BLUFF PETERS lAli'DERHlll. P. T. HORIZON PINEWOOD lLOYD ESTATES I ~'DL"N TRACE QUIET WATERS MARSHALL. THt.JRGOOD MAPlEWooD SANDPIPER NORTH LAt.'DERDAlE I PANTHER RUN SA WGRASS NORTH SlOE PEMBROKE LAKES SEA CASTLE ORIOLE I PINES L\K.ES SHERIDAN PARK PALM\'IEW I RIVERSIDE Sll VER lAKES PARK RIDGE , WELLES\" SIL VER PALMS I PLASl'A TION I WESTCHESTER STIRL~G PLA~TA nON PARK T AMAkAC RIVERlASD i "C" SCHOOLS TRADE'N1NDS ROCK ISLAND ! ATLANTIC WEST TROPICAL ROYAL PAlM WINSTON PARK SAA'DERS PARK I BANYAN YOu"NG. VIRGINJA SUNlANDPARK BENNETT TEDDER ! BOUlEVARD HEIGHTS "D" SCHOOLS "'lTH 1 VILLAGE COCONUT CREEK SCORE BELOW CRITERIA WALKER CORAL SPRINGS W A TKlNS DAVIE CROISS......~T PARK WESTWOOD HEIGHTS DEERfIELD BEACH CYPRESS DRIFTWOOD lAKE FOREST "f" SCHOOLS EAGLE RIDGE MARKHAM FLAMINGO MCNAB DIlL6JlD FLORANADA MIRAMAR HOLLYWOOD PARK FOREST HILLS NORCREST MEADOWBROOK FOSTER. STEPHEN POMPANO BEACH NORTH FORK FOX TRAIL SHERmAN HILLS HARBORDALE SUNSHINE HOLLYWOOD CENTRAL WEST HOLLYWOOD HOLLYWOOD HILLS WILTON MANORS 12 CORAL SPRINGS PIONEER RAMBLEWOOD SA WGRASS SPRINGS SILVER TRAIL . TEQUEST A TRACE YOUNG, WALTER C. "B" SCHOOLS FOREST GLEN INDIAN RIDGE COOPER CITY CORAL SPRINGS FLANAGAN FORT LAUDERDALE MCARTHUR NORTHEAST NOVA PLANTATION POMPANO BEACH INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES STONEMAN DOUGLAS STRANAHAN TARAVELLA, J.P. WESTERN CITY OF PEMBROKE PINES "C" SCHOOLS SOMERSET NEIGHBORHOOD MIDDLE SCHOOLS APOLLO BAIR DRIFTWOOD MARGA TE NOVA OLSEN PINES PLANTATION POMPANO BEACH RICKARDS SEMINOLE SILVER LAKES SUNRISE WESTPINE HIGH SCHOOLS SCORE BELOW CRITERIA COCONUT CREEK MIRAMAR SOUTH PLANT A nON "D" SCHOOLS WITH 1 SCORES BELOW CRlTER'\ ANDERSON, BOYD H. DILLARD ELY HALLANDALE PIPER SCORES BELOW CRITERIA NORTH LAUDERDALE SCORE BELOW CRITERIA ATTUCKS CRYSTAL LAKE DEERFIELD BEACH MCNICOL NEW RIVER PARKWAY PERRY, HENRY D. "D" SCHOOLS WITH 1 SCORES BELOW CRITERIA DANDY, WILLIAM LAUDERHILL "F" SCHOOLS LAUDERDALE LAKES DEERFIELD BEACH "I" SCHOOLS HOLLYWOOD HILLS SOUTH BROW ARC SMART SCHOOL 13 Dlvlsloa of AccountablUty, Tecbnolou, Strateatc Plunm. and Schoollmprov_eat .~U.I! , , , " : 'a;1 I cJ '. .. I ~ I =:. !....e:cr':,-g -'-. It! 1 lilJ liB 1::1'11 11=1=. J~Jl . b't ifit J ~ il J jut] . 1 J J ,. 11111 J'II!'. I '] ! ,J t . I -. uJfI , l.~ ! 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